Who’s Who in Cloud February 8, 2013

Snow Cloud

Our weekly cloud roundup.

Happy Friday! It’s a snowy one here in the Northeast. (Nemo, it seems, has found us.) It was a big week for cloud, with key players talking about Dell’s deal to go private, cloud computing costs, PCI compliance, and more. Read on for our roundup of the best news and commentary in cloud.

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Alex Williams reports on a new Parallels forecast that the global cloud service market will grow to reach $95 billion by 2015.

“The cloud will shake markets,” Kevin Jackson says, discussing the future of data centers and cloud service providers.

Bernard Golden outlines the three “Ms” that he says are driving cloud computing — mobile, media, and marketing.

Scott Alan Miller asks: “Is cloud computing really right for your business?”

Rick Blaisdell points to collaboration and mobility among other cloud computing advantages for the healthcare industry over at his blog.

Over at Forbes, Cincom Systems’ Louis Columbus dives into cloud computing and enterprise software market estimates from Gartner and Forrester.

[ See 7 Ways Cloud Enables Innovation ]

Ben Kepes breaks down cloud computing costs.

“The next generation of hybrid cloud solutions will enable cloud migration and integration, with cloud failover, cloud devtest (cloud cloning) and cloud bursting,” Greg Ness writes as his blog. “Look for these solutions to enter the market this year and next, and usher in the new age of the cloud service provider.”

Verizon Enterprise Solutions’ David Small was also talking hybrid cloud this week, with a post at Forbes’ CIO Network in which he charts five trends to track this year.

It’s not the SaaS you’re thinking of — Bob Violino talks security-as-a-service, discussing how “cloud-delivered security offerings differ from traditional products,” among other things.

The PCI Security Standards Council this week released its Data Security Standard Cloud Computing Guidelines Information Supplement, a document that should clear up some compliance confusion, Thor Olavsrud writes. Ellen Messmer elaborates, saying that the new guidance delves into “how these traditional security controls ought to be applied in cloud-computing environments, whether they be models defined as infrastructure-as-a-service, platform as-a-service or software-as-a-service.”

[ See Hybrid Cloud Will Change the (Business) World ]

And who could forget Dell? The PC maker this week announced a $24.4 billion deal to go private, spurring much commentary on the firm’s potential to reposition itself as a cloud company. Ted Samson says that while going private won’t save Dell, rebranding and repurposing might. Meanwhile, Todd Nielsen predicts Dell will emerge a top cloud player.

Check out last week’s roundup, here.

By Jake Gardner

One thought on “Who’s Who in Cloud February 8, 2013

  1. Pingback: Who’s Who in Cloud February 15, 2013 Gathering Clouds

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