Cloud Valentines: 7 Love Notes from the Cloud

Readers of this blog know: There are lots of reasons to love the cloud. Here are seven ways it has shown us some love in return.

Cloud Love

There are lots of reasons to love the cloud.

1. Cloud in healthcare

As is increasingly discussed, cloud computing is a major boon to healthcare organizations despite the knee-jerk pushback associated with security and compliance concerns around patient data. While the issues are real, we have nevertheless seen an increasing shift toward the cloud from a range of healthcare organizations. Even large organizations like IBM are approaching the change with open arms (for a few reasons to be sure), using cloud to empower Watson to help Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center physicians access the wealth of knowledge they’ve accumulated over decades of fighting cancer.

2. Wacky weather

Superstorm Sandy. “Winter Storm Nemo.” Both created major disruptions for businesses, beyond the damage and difficulty they created for thousands of people. Climate change is not slowing down (although we would like it to) and with the potential for more events like Sandy, there are only a few precautions businesses can take to ensure that their revenue portals stay up and running. Cloud has definitely been battle tested by the recent storms, and is proving to be a way to not only ensure business continuity, but to maintain brand continuity as well.

[ See What Sandy Says About What Cloud Provider You Should Choose ]

3. Amazon Web Services

Love it or hate it (we prefer love), AWS is setting the pace for much of our industry. While many companies seek to differentiate their services, with only the mega clouds — Google, HP, and Microsoft — directly competing with the cloud giant, others have found ways to bring added value to the AWS offering . AWS also provides an interesting case study for how contemporary businesses are learning to embrace the cloud for what it is — accepting its positive attributes along with its shortcomings.

4. Marketing madness

Cloud hasn’t simply spawned business engagement, it’s created social engagement. For a relatively young industry, the amount of commentary on any given cloud-related topic on any given day is incredible. It might seem unmanageable, but with so many good ideas from so many different people, it’s not a problem to just jump into the conversation using social media. Where that becomes convoluted, however, is when the information being put into the public conversation isn’t accurate. Cloud washing, a well-documented issue, has kept us scratching our heads and approaching marketing campaigns with a healthy dose of skepticism.

And, on that note …

5. Oracle

Oracle Logo

Oracle's cloud drama has been fun to follow.

Who doesn’t love a little drama? While Oracle’s sensational cloud storyline has been fun to follow. With no end in sight for its continued posturing, the company’s coming year promises to provide us all with a view into how not to pitch a service. That being said, bless them for continuing to be a major market player given the amount of competition in the space.

[ See The Top 5 Things You Are Probably Doing Wrong in AWS ]

6. Cloud investment

One of the most encouraging bellwethers for the development of the cloud industry are the continued investments being made. More and more venture dollars are being poured into cloud companies turning what was once just an idea for a cohesive industry into one of the most interesting and dynamic markets globally. The investments, however, present a double-edged sword for businesses developing in the space, since over-saturation is never good. However, we’re still at the beginning of the gold rush, and with maturity comes an elimination of the worst and an elevation of the best.

7. David Linthicum, Ben Kepes, Barb Darrow, and other “Clouderati”

As geeks for the cloud, we admire our fellow cloud geeks. And so, our fondest Valentine wishes go out to David, Barb, Ben, and the many others who have shared their wisdom with us.

By Jake Gardner

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